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Postby Tony Minoldo » Tue Mar 06 2007, 11:15

Steve,

I think yours was a very good idea about this topic, so let's get started with a classic coaching session for beginners. I particularly like to teach them individual technique then maybe a short game before a lenghty SSG. I observed a colleague from Brazil doing this and he explained to me that's the way they do, they let the kids do a lot of moves to beat an opponent, rather than SSG encouraging 1 or 2-touch football as I've seen too many coaches doing.

I wonder what would've been of the likes of Kaka', Ronaldinho and Co. if their youth coaches would have adopted 1 or 2-touch football

Comments?
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Postby crewealexfc » Tue Mar 06 2007, 11:31

i watched a programme recently on sky about deco, and he only played 3 a side until he was 16!

From improving a player technically, i think thats a great idea, and of course your reactions can become a lot quicker, but do you think it's a problem not playing any competitive 11 a side football until then?

Personally i would think the 3 a side is a lot better for technical improvement, especially when your young.
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Postby slim shady » Tue Mar 06 2007, 13:20

Tony Minoldo wrote:Steve,

I think yours was a very good idea about this topic, so let's get started with a classic coaching session for beginners. I particularly like to teach them individual technique then maybe a short game before a lenghty SSG. I observed a colleague from Brazil doing this and he explained to me that's the way they do, they let the kids do a lot of moves to beat an opponent, rather than SSG encouraging 1 or 2-touch football as I've seen too many coaches doing.

I wonder what would've been of the likes of Kaka', Ronaldinho and Co. if their youth coaches would have adopted 1 or 2-touch football

Comments?


Ask the lads (who remian) from last years Uni side. I nicked one of my main warm-up routines from a coaching Mentor (Russell Mason) I have the players in a 20 x 20 grid (numbers dependant) and each have a ball. They then have to follow what I do. I take them through a set of different exercises that makes them manipulate the ball, stand on the ball etc. all involving quick feet. I do this for approx. 15-20 minutes building up the tempo as we go. I also knicked one of Dabba's doing everything to a count of 1,2,3.

I think we get bogged down with 2 touch for 2 reasons.

1. With kids if there's only one ball the best player is going to be dribbling away with it and none of the others will get a touch.

2. With adults we are always trying to encourage players to "Pass and move" and we do it by limiting touches. Where we go wrong is assuming that players have a good touch in the first place. All too often players haven't developed the "touch" or technique side of their game well enough to play 1 or 2 touch which our South American friends have.

Steve
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Postby Tony Minoldo » Tue Mar 06 2007, 22:55

Steve,

That's a great warm up, I know some pro clubs do that kind of warm up. can't do anything like that it this year, though, because we don't have enough footballs!

In training I like to use 2v2s and 3v3s. With more advanced players (the Uni lads, for instance, and the U18 at Chi City Utd) I like to coach 11 v 11 and to work in the tactical aspects (movement of the ball, fast counter-attack, switching the zone of play).

Regarding the 1 or 2 touch question, I think you've made a very good point: We assume the players have a good touch!

I think it's fine to play with a limited number of touches at a certain age and level and with the players who should do or are more likely to do so during matches. For instance, I like my teams to play fast from the back, thus we often train in 1 touch combination attacking from the full-backs of the centre-halves.

When working with younger players, I encouraged them to take on opponents.

Also, I believe that the coach has to be aware of other circumstances such as the weather. It's a lot easier to teach or to practice 'moves to beat an opponent' in a summer camp in Wisconsin with 35 degrees C, than in the rainy English winter, where the children get wet, cold and impatient...
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Speed of Play

Postby Tony Minoldo » Tue Mar 06 2007, 23:00

There I go with another topic, I hope is food for thought: What do you lads think about the speed of play and attacking from the back?

Personally, I find most teams playing in WSPL have 'plan A' only, with 2 options: Option 1: Long ball from the goalkeeper; option 2: Long ball from either full back.

Similar thing can be said of some County level U18 teams.

Centre-halves, contrarily to the Italian or the German tradition, from example, do not attack with the ball at their feet. Why?
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Postby Geoff » Tue Mar 06 2007, 23:50

Why don't you start new topics?
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